The late Bob Arrotta calling in airstrikes in Southeast Asia.
The late Bob Arrotta calling in airstrikes in Southeast Asia.
The decade of the '60s was a very difficult and dangerous time for our country.  We didn't all agree with the military polices of the leadership of that period, but we surely respect our classmates who made so many sacrifices to serve our country. 

Veterans, please provide a brief description of your service here so we can honor you.


 
  Bruce McQuilkin (deceased)
Friday, March 27, 2015
Bruce distinguished himself in his service as a helicopeter pilot in the Army.  During the Vietnam War in addition to flying air support for soldiers on the ground, he flew hundreds of missions in support of medevac helicopters untiil his last flight in which he was severely injured.  Bruce's helicopter took enemy fire. His gunner and other crew were injured. Then Bruce took a huge "bullet" nearly severing his foot.  Bleeding profusely and in severe pain but determined to get his crew to safety and care, Bruce bravely flew them back to base. After several surguries in theater, Bruce's leg was amputated below the knee. Bruce was high decorated for his bravely with Bronze Star, Purple Heart and many other service medals. His injury never held him back.  After being fitted for his prosthesis, Bruce immediately left the hospital in CA and flew direcly to be in the wedding of his best high school friends, David and Mary Slaby. Bruce lived the rest of life as a gifted and highly regarded artist, working in rare woods. He became an accompllished skier.  Before his very sudden and unexpected death in the early '80s from an annurism, he had found the love of his life. You will be missed at the reunion, friend.
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  Steve Robertson
Friday, March 20, 2015
Was a member of the District of Columbia Army National Guard from 1970 until 1976. Nick(Dallas) Barr and I traveled to Fort Dix for basic training on the same day! I experienced no deployment to Vietnam as did many of our veteran classmates. I feel somewhat guilty about that, but have unwavering respect for those who answered their Country's call to combat. I admire the personal sacrifice of those who served protecting their comrades in battle. My military duty was as a truck mechanic for the 115th Evacuation Hospital. The only action that I ever experienced, was patrolling the streets of Washington during the 1971 protests. We had a Jeep, our gas masks, and empty M-16's. It is interesting to note that the 1971 May Day protests, resulted in the largest mass arrest in United States history.
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  Captain, Steven Beattie, CEC, USN
Thursday, March 19, 2015
Graduating from University of Maryland in 1969 (just six months prior to the Military Draft Lottery), I applied for the Navy Civil Engineer Corps (CEC) Officer Commissioning Program; with the thought of surely avoiding military duty in the warzone of Vietnam....boy was I WRONG..... turns out, once i was selected for the program, it was not a bad overall life-time decision, but a short-term very surprising result.  After but a one year tour in the Pacific Northwest at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, WA, I received orders to attend six months of Vietnames Language School, Survival Training (where I experienced first-hand the "Art of Water-Boarding Torture" !!), and Vietnamese Cultural Lifestyle Appreciation.  In January 1972, I deployed to a small armor boat Riverine base in the southern jungles of Vietnam, working as an Engineering Advisor as part of the US Military Advisory Command to commence turn-over to our South Vietnamese counterparts.  I thankfully survived the first eight month deployment; followed up immediately by four months based in Danang, with periodic patrols to just south of the Demilitarized Zone *(DMZ), where I served as the last Navy CEC Officer in "I-Corps":.  With no departure from the warzone for 366 days, I returned safely and happily in 1973 to San Franciso, landing just a few planes prior to the arrival of John McCain and our loyal heroic POW's.  As part of my 28 year career as an installation engineer, Navy SEABEE, and several tours in DC at the Pentagon Headquarters level, I wrapped up a career during the first Desert War by supporting our Armed Forces and Naval Aviators from our Naval Air Station in Sicily, Italy; typically referred to as our "Land-Based Aircraft Carrier".  After retiring In Washington, DC from active duty in 1997 and taking a ten year break from direct military service to work as an international construction consultant, I re-joined the Navy at the Historic Washington DC Navy Yard seven years ago as a Navy Federal Employee, working as part of a truly amazing team of professionals to sustain and maintain our facilities and utilities at our 70 Navy installations around the Globe.  So I can honestly say that I learned an appreciation for the importance of friendship and loyalty during our days together at Walt Whitman; and have been very fortunate with my own family to continue to enjoy the friendship and loyalty of the worldwide military family and specifically the Navy SEABEES deployed around the world.  I SALUTE, with the deepest of respect, all our military classmates who have served our great country at far and out-of-the-way outposts of the world; and have a very strong admiration and thankfulness to those of our Nation who have and continue to serve us every day and night to protect our freedom we have come to expect and enjoy here in the Great USA.
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  Jay (Joseph) Vivari
Monday, March 16, 2015
1st Lieutenant, Military Intelligence, U.S. Army, 1970 - 1971.  Quang Tri, DMZ, Khe Sanh, Saigon, RVN.  A thoroughly miserable experience. The only highlight was running in to classmate Bob Dudley at the Bob Hope USO Show in Phu Bai in December 1970.  Bob and I were subsequently able to wrangle an R&R trip together to Sydney, so we did our best to represent Whitman to the lovely Aussie ladies we met.
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  Bob Wallace
Friday, March 13, 2015
I was drafted in July 1968, spent a useless year at Ft. Riley Kansas and then got my chance to go to Vietnam in July 1969. I served in the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment under Col. George Patton IV, who's dad was the famous/infamous WW II tank commander. Like father like son. He carried his dad's pearl handled .45 caliber revolvers everywhere. Lots of flight time shepherding battle plans to/from the rear area at Bien Hoa. Homecoming was less than spectacular because of the anti war movement. My wife suffered tremendous harrassment while I was overseas.
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  David Breeskin
Friday, February 6, 2015
I enlisted in the Army jan.19th 1966 and served 3years. Basic was Ft. Dix Nj.One tour in Vietnam and was assigned to Ft. Meade Md.As Field Band pianist for special events. Made rank of E5.We toured all of the United States.Public Relations representing the Army and my country was important especially in those times.
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  Robert G. Berg
Tuesday, January 6, 2015
My story as a veteran is fairly short. My family moved to Los Altos, CA soon after I graduated from Walt Whitman. While attending Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, I enrolled in the AFROTC program which was offered there. Upon graduation from BYU I entered the Air Force as a 2nd Lt. and was stationed at Laughlin AFB in Del Rio, Texas for Pilot Training. Following UPT I spent about 10 weeks in Littlerock, Arkansas for training in the Hercules C-130 (turboporp transport). I spent one year at Clark Air Base in the Philippines during which time I was sent over to Utapao Air Base in Thailand where we basically were an airborn bus/truck service for our air bases in Thailand. I did get into Cambodia a few times to take supplies and people into Phnom Penh whick was about the last piece of real estate in Cambodia not yet taken over by the Khmer Rouge. During that year I got around to a few other interesting places in that part of the world as well. My next assignment was at Dyess AFB in Abilene, Texas. Our main duty there as to maintain proficiency in the aircraft and to provide transport for groups like the Army Airborn people out of North Carolina when they had "exercises" and trips to Panama. We also went to Germany or England for 70 day "TDY" assigments to move people and equipment around in Europe. Shortly after our direct envolvement in Vietnam, the govenment found itself with too many aircrews for a peace time condition. They offered early reseases to pilots and navigators who had fulfilled at least 4 years of their 6 year initial obligations. Not being a hardened military man, I opted for civilian life and returned to BYU and the persuit of other interests.
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  John Stevens
Sunday, January 4, 2015
Commissioned Ensign, USNR 1969.  Three SouthEast Asia tours:  USS Dubuque LPD 8(1968);USS Carpenter DD-825(1969-1970); USS Oriskany CVA 34 (1970-72):  JAGC USNR 1976-1997); Retired Captain, JAGC,  USNR 1997.
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  Steve Johnson
Wednesday, December 3, 2014
Enlisted U.S. Army Nov, 1967.  Basic Training-Ft. Bragg, N.C., AIT-Ft. Knox, KY, Redeye Missle Training-Ft. Bliss, TX.  Assigned to 2d Btn. 37 Armored of the 4th Armored Division Monteith Barracks, Furth, Germany Apr. 1968 to August 1970. Attended 7th Army NCO Academy, Bad Tolz, Germany,1968.  Redeye missle training (top secret at the time) required a security clearance that kept me a half globe's distance from Viet Nam, a distance I much appreciated!  Toured and enjoyed Europe on Uncle Sam and received an early out to return to college in August of 1970.  MOS - 11E4Q   Rank E5 SGT. 
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  John Barrett
Monday, November 17, 2014
Enlisted USMC June '65. Arrived Vietnam May '66. Joined Metropolitan Police Dept. Washington D.C., June '70. Arrested " Watergate" burglar's June 17, 1972. Disability retired Feb., '89. Bosnia Herzegovina,Feb. '98, with the United Nation's I.P.T.F ( Internation Police Task Force) assigned to the town of Brcko. June, rescued a dog and returned home.
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  Larry Beckler
Thursday, November 13, 2014
I was the singer/ announcer for the New York Army Band. We were stationed at Fort Wadsworth which was the smallest fort in the Army. (1 square mile). It was located under the Staten Island side of the Verrazanno Bridge. We led all 5th Avenue Parades, performed often at the Goldman Band Shell in Central Park and had constant gigs for special events. I performed for Lady Byrd Johnson at the statue of Liberty when she was dedicating some treeees, shruuuubs and boooshes. Many friends who fought in Viet Nam told me how important the entertainers were to their moral. On the airplane, the day I got out of the service, a woman called me a baby killer. I pray for our first responders and uniformed heroes every night.  
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  Chris Rears
Wednesday, November 12, 2014
Officer of  Marines - November 1969 to June 2000.
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  Steve Ellisor
Monday, October 20, 2014
US Navy from Nov. 1968 to Jan 1973.  I was a Hospital Corpsman.  69-71 ran the EEG lab at St Albans Naval Hospital in Queens, NY.  Transfered to duty with USMC at the Marince Corps Air Station, Beaufort, SC.  Flew search and rescue and supported MAG-31's personnel until discharge Jan 1973.
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  Patrick Fleeharty
Monday, October 20, 2014
US Army ROTC at Western Maryland College.  Commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in 1969, completed training as an Infantry officer at Ft. Benning, GA.  Assigned to Ft. Hood, TX, where I acted, for a time, as the 2nd Armored Division Social Work Officer.  Remained stateside, due to a knee injury.
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  Bob Dudley
Sunday, October 19, 2014
Colonel (R) Dudley enlisted in the Army in 1968 and after serving at Fort Bragg, North Carolina and Fort Jackson, South Carolina; he attended Field Artillery Officer Candidate School at Fort Sill, Oklahoma.  Commissioned in February 1970, he was initially assigned as a gunnery instructor at Fort Sill until being transferred to Vietnam where he served as a forward observer, a fire direction officer, and a battery executive officer in the 5th Battalion, 4th Artillery, 5th Infantry Division along the Demilitarized Zone and the Laotian border.  Returning to the United States in August 1971, he was assigned to XVIII Airborne Corps Artillery at Fort Bragg until attending Campbell College as part of the Army's degree completion program in 1974.   Following completion of the Field Artillery Advanced Course in 1975, Colonel (R) Dudley was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 8th Field Artillery, 25th Infantry Division at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii where he served as a battery commander, the battalion fire direction officer, and the battalion S1.  Following this assignment, he attended the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California earning a Masters of Science degree in Management, and then attended the Armed Forces Staff College in Norfolk, Virginia.   From July 1980 to June 1984, he once again served at Fort Sill where he was an instructor in the Tactics and Combined Arms Department; the executive officer of the 2nd Battalion, 37th Field Artillery; and served on the garrison staff as the Chief, Officer Management for the Field Artillery Center and Fort Sill.   Upon reassignment to Germany in 1984, he became the S3, 72d Field Artillery Brigade in Wertheim and in 1985 assumed command of the 3d Battalion, 35th Field Artillery also located in Wertheim.  Following his tour in Germany in 1987, he was assigned to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas where he served in the Center for Army Tactics until attending the U.S. War College Fellowship at the School of Advanced Military Studies in 1988.   In May 1990, he was assigned to Korea where he assumed duties at Osan Air Base as the Chief, Battlefield Coordination Element, Republic of Korea/United States (ROK/US) Combined Forces Command/Commander, Detachment 1, Eighth United States Army.  Upon his return to the United States, he commanded the U.S. Army Readiness Group at Fort Sill and served as the Director/Commander, Fire Support Test Directorate, U.S. Army Test and Experimentation Command.  In 1995, he was reassigned to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas where he served as the Director, Requirements Documentation Directorate, U.S. Army Force Management Support Agency until his retirement in November 1997.  
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  david slaby
Sunday, October 19, 2014
I served five years in the Navy. I spent two plus years on polaris submarines, making four strategic patrols.  I spent my last two years on the staff of Admiral Moorer, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, at the Pentagon.
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